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Aug 26, 2014
A trough of low pressure will clip our northern mountains today bringing a couple high based thunderstorms to them, with winds and cooling for everyone else. Damaging surf from Hurricane Marie well offshore will arrive on our beaches Wednesday into Thursday with erosion and flooding possible for some beach communities, especially in Orange County.




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Wednesday morning powerful Thunderstorms taking place over Temecula, video shot by site owner Michael Mojarro.


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**Forecast: Tuesday, August, 26th, 2014, 1:00am**

Look for a slightly cooler day today with increased onshore flow as a potent trough of low pressure for August standards moves down through the Sierras and the Great Basin bottoming out and clipping the San Bernardino Mountains. Look for the marine layer to be present along the coast for most of the day. Although there isn't a lot of moisture in the area, at least of the monsoon variety, this trough will bring some descent lift and dynamics to the L.A and San Bernardino mountains this afternoon. With good day time heating, i think there is a fair chance of a couple high based thunderstorms firing off this afternoon over those mountains, with the best chance near Big Bear where the best dynamics will come together. Dry lighting and strong down draft winds will be the main concern, but there could be an isolated down pour or two near any stronger cells. One of these could drift into the high desert, mainly near the Lucerne Valley and Yucca Valley. West of the mountains and likely all mountains do the south will stay dry. Highs will be about 3-5 degrees cooler and a tad below normal with 70s along the coast, 70s and 80s for the coastal valleys, and mid 80s and 90s for the I.E. In the lower deserts look for highs between 101-109. Winds will be strong near the Banning Pass and Coachella Valley in the evening with gust up to 55mph possible, with blowing dust and sand. Lows in the 50s and 60s west of the mountains and upper 30s and 40s in the mountains.

The much talked about Hurricane Marie now moving well offshore of the coast of Baja will continue north west Wednesday into Thursday. The once Category 5 storms will continue to gradually weaken, eventually into a Tropical storm by Wednesday. Any moisture with this storm is now expected to stay well west of our region way out into the ocean. But with that being said, So Cal will likely see the Biggest impacts we have seen from an Hurricane in several years as monster swells/waves from the storm will arrive along our coast Wednesday into Thursday. South west facing beaches looks to get hit the hardest, which means most of Orange county, where waves will likely peak at high Tide Wednesday in the 15-20 ft range, with smaller but still large and damaging wave in San Diego county in the 8-12 foot range. These will be some of the biggest waves we have seen in the past decade and could cause damage to any coastal houses and piers, flooding may move into some towns right along the shore during high tide and plenty of erosion is likely. So a very dangerous situation along our beaches, any not well experienced swimmers and surfer need to stay out of the water and keep their distance. If you live along the beach keep a close eye on the waves and water through the day, sand bag the areas around your houses. The waves will gradually get smaller through Thursday then drop back off to non threatening levels by Friday. Weather wise we will see plenty of mid and high level clouds from the system but remain dry. Highs will rise a bit through Friday to around normal or a degree or two above with 70s along the coast, 80s and 90s for the coastal valleys and lower 90s and 100s for the I.E., and 104-112 in the lower deserts. High pressure will begin to weaken for the Labor day weekend with a slow cooling trend for what many consider the last weekend of the summer festivities, but officially summer isnt over til the 22nd of September.

Looking further ahead to the first week of September, it may very well feel like summer is coming to an early end. A deep and unusually cool trough of low pressure will move down the west coast through the week, increasing onshore flow and dropping temps to well below normal by next Wednesday. In fact there is event a shot of the first snowfall of the 104/2015 wet season way up in the Northern Sierras along their highest mountain peaks. Highs down here at the moment look like they could fall into the mid 70s and 80s inland, with 60s along the coast. A deep marine layer will develop for the night and morning. In the mountain it will be cool and crisp with 60s overall above 5000ft, with only 50s for highs up there above 8000ft. Nights will be the coolest since May with the dry cool air in place, with upper 40s and 50s west of the mountains and upper 20s and 30s in the mountains, with the first freeze since late Spring likely up in Big Bear. All of this isn't entirely unheard of, as usually the west coast first real cool trough of low pressure arrives sometime during the middle of September, so just a tad early this year. It appears trough will continue through at least the 10th of the month at this time so highs will remain below normal for quite sometime, and the monsoon will be pushed well off to our east, maybe all the way to New Mexico, allowing Arizona to finally dry out for a bit after a very very wet summer over in that area. Im working on getting the winter outlook out to all VIP members, but I'm having some issues getting into the sites email server. I have IT working on it right now and i should be able to send it to everyone by sometime tomorrow. Thanks for your patience!

2014/2015 Winter Outlook for be sent to all VIP members by Tuesday evening, and published for the general public here on th site on September 14th!

Site Owner/Forecaster, Michael Mojarro
webmaster@socalweather.net


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Disclaimer: Socalweather.net is a privately run weather site and all forecast and possible advisories issued in no way are related to the National Weather Service or any government agency but from the sole guidance of forecaster Michael Mojarro, weather can not be controlled and all forecast are to be followed at your own will.